Thursday, February 4, 2016

Newton-Raphson revisited

This post presents two variants of the computation of the root of a function, implemented in Scala

The Newton-Raphson is a well-know technique to compute the root of a function, f(x) = 0 or the minimum/maximum of a function using its derivative f'(x) = 0.
The simplicity of the Newton-Raphson method, in term of concept as well as implementation makes it a very popular solution. We will look into two different implementation in Scala and conclude the post by evaluation the relative benefits and limitations of the Newton-Raphson.

First implementation
Let's dive into the computation of the root x of a function f. A function is defined by its Taylor series of derivatives as follow:
\[f(s)=\sum_{0}^{\infty }\frac{f^{(n)}(x)}{n!}(s-x)^{n}\] In case of the root f(s), the equation becomes
\[0=f(x)+f'(x)(x-s)+O((x-s)^{2}f"(s))\] resulting to
\[x_{n+1}=x_{n}- \frac{f(x_{n})}{f'(x_{n})}\]

 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
final class NewtonRaphson(
  f:   Double => Double,
  df:  Double => Double,
  dff: Option[Double => Double] = None
) {
  final val EPS = 0.01

  @scala.annotation.tailrec
  def root(z: Double): Double = dff.map(_dff => {
    val nextX = x - f(x) / df(x)
    if (Math.abs(nextX - x) < EPS) nextX 
    else root(nextX)
  }
}

The construtor (lines 2 to 4) takes 3 arguments:
  • Function which root is to be computed
  • First order derivative
  • Optional second order derivative that is not used in this first implementation
The formula is implemented by the method root (lines 9 to 12).Let's apply the root method to a concrete example, with function f and its derivative ff:

1
2
3
4
5
val f = (x: Double) => Math.pow(x, 5.0) - 2.0*x
val ff = (x: Double) => 5.0*Math.pow(x,4.0) -2.0
 
val nr1 = new NewtonRaphson(f, ff)
val z1 = nr1.root(7.9)

So far so good. However it is assumed that the function has a single root, or in the case of a maximum/minimum, its derivative has single root, at least in the vicinity of the initial data point. What about computing the root of a function which may have no or several root?
Let's look at the following function g and its derivate gg

1
2
3
4
val g = (x: Double) => Math.exp(0.5 * x)
val gg = (x: Double) => 0.5 * g(x)

val nr3 = new NewtonRaphson(g, gg)

The call to the Newton-Raphson method nr5 will diverge. In this particular case, the computation generates a Double.NaN, at each itertion.
There are several options to guarantee that the method will properly exit in the case no root exists. Let's look at one solution that leverages on the second derivative.

Second derivative to the rescue
We need to go back to basics: in its simplest form, the Newton-Raphson does not take into account the derivative of order higher than 1. The second order derivative, f" can be used as rough approximation of the error on the approximation of the root. The error san be evaluated at each iteration against a convergence criteria EPS.
\[\Delta \varepsilon = \varepsilon _{n+1}- \varepsilon _{n} \sim \frac{f'(x_{n})}{f"(x_{n})} < EPS\] \[x_{n+1}=x_{n}-\frac{f(x_{n})}{f'(x_{n})}(1 + \Delta \varepsilon)\] The approximation of the error is also used to validate whether the algorithm converges toward a solution (root) or starts to diverge. Let's implement this variation of the Newton-Raphson using the second order derivative as a convergence criteria.

 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
@scala.annotation.tailrec
def root(z: Double): Double = dff.map(_dff => {

  @scala.annotation.tailrec
  def nr2ndOrder(xe: (Double, Double)): (Double, Double) = {
    val x = xe._1
    val eps = xe._2
      
    val nextEps = Math.abs(df(x) / _dff(x))
    val nextX = (x - f(x) *(1.0 + nextEps)/df(x))

    // rules to exit recursion
    if (eps > 0.0 && nextEps >= eps)
      (-1.0, -1.0)
    else if (Math.abs(nextEps - eps) < EPS) 
      (nextX, nextEps)
     else 
       nr2ndOrder((nextX, nextEps))
  }
  
  nr2ndOrder((z, 0.0))._1
}).getOrElse(DIVERGE)

Once again, the computation of the root is implemented as an efficient tail recursion defined in the method nr2ndOrder (line 5)
The convergence criteria is implemented as follow:
  • if error, eps increases, exit the recursion => Diverge (lines 13 and 22)
  • if eps decreases with a value within the convergence criteria => Converged (line 15)
  • if eps decreases with a value higher than the convergence criteria => Recurse (line 18)


Summary
Let's compare the convergence of the simplest Newton-Raphson method with the convergence its variant using the 2nd order derivative, using the function f defined in the first paragraph.


Clearly, the adaptive step size using the second order derivative speeds up the convergence toward the root of the function f. The selection of the appropriate method comes down to the trade-off between the overhead of the computation of the second derivative and the larger number of iterations or recursions required to find the root within a predefined convergence criteria.

References
Programming in Scala 2nd Edition M. Odersky, L. Spoon, B. Venners - Artima - 2012
The Newton-Raphson method

3 comments:

  1. Great Article I love to read your articles because your writing style is too good, its is very very helpful for all of us and I never get bored while reading your article because it becomes more and more interesting from the starting lines until the end. So Thank you for sharing a COOL Meaningful stuff with us Keep it up..!

    SAP training in Chennai

    ReplyDelete

  2. All are saying the same thing repeatedly, but in your blog I had a chance to get some useful and unique information, I love your writing style very much, I would like to suggest your blog in my dude circle, so keep on updates.

    SAP training in Chennai

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wow amazing i saw the article with execution models you had posted. It was such informative. Really its a wonderful article. Thank you for sharing and please keep update like this type of article because i want to learn more relevant to this topic.


    SEO Company in Chennai

    ReplyDelete